Spelman College Intro to Women's Studies

newwavefeminism:

ok someone asked me about this the other day and it finally came on my dashboard…

this is almost too stupid to even respond to. If someone was bitter enough to make this pathetic ass article… well that’s their life…

*flips hair*

Schools have classes called “women’s studies,” and “African-American literature” because the standard for existence set by white men has yet to be rescinded in this age. “Normal” history is the history of a certain class of white people, from the perspective of men. All the other histories are precisely that: other.
Cunt:  A Declaration of Independence.  (via thenewwomensmovement)
newwavefeminism:

karnythia:

shotofjen:

stfuconservatives:

robot-heart-politics:

jordanrien:

Fuck what everyone is saying, this is ACCURATE.
Everest bitches are scary,
and they are usually lower class people.
There are class systems in America.
Face it, Everest students are at the bottom.
The girls there are scary.

Because a woman breastfeeding an infant is absolutely terrifying. Right.

R-H-P is doing a good job of covering this right now, but yeah, people are flipping their classist racist shit at this image of a young mother daring to breastfeed her child in a college classroom. NO, she should not go to the bathroom to feed her child — is that where you eat your lunch? NO, she should not pick a “better time and place” for this. The right time and place is when and where your baby is hungry. Breastfeeding is a completely natural part of life, not something disgusting or icky that we should have to hide. A baby’s need for nutrition trumps your hang-ups about seeing a partially exposed boob.
-Jess

My only dislike of this is that they do make covers you can wear if you need to breast feed in public, but I know they’re a pretty much a luxury if you are short on cash. 

Do you eat with a blanket over your head? No. Guess what? Neither should babies.

You know what’s awesome, growing up in a community where everything you and your neighbors, classmates, and peers do is mocked and described as “lower class.” It does wonders for your sense of self worth growing up.
We keep talking about the war on the middle class, and that’s all fine but when are we going to address how vile and hateful we are to the “lower class.”
this in combination with that "If I was a black kid" (even though i’m actually a privileged white guy) with his “why don’t black kids do better” article - i am done with the internet today

newwavefeminism:

karnythia:

shotofjen:

stfuconservatives:

robot-heart-politics:

jordanrien:

Fuck what everyone is saying, this is ACCURATE.

Everest bitches are scary,

and they are usually lower class people.

There are class systems in America.

Face it, Everest students are at the bottom.

The girls there are scary.

Because a woman breastfeeding an infant is absolutely terrifying. Right.

R-H-P is doing a good job of covering this right now, but yeah, people are flipping their classist racist shit at this image of a young mother daring to breastfeed her child in a college classroom. NO, she should not go to the bathroom to feed her child — is that where you eat your lunch? NO, she should not pick a “better time and place” for this. The right time and place is when and where your baby is hungry. Breastfeeding is a completely natural part of life, not something disgusting or icky that we should have to hide. A baby’s need for nutrition trumps your hang-ups about seeing a partially exposed boob.

-Jess

My only dislike of this is that they do make covers you can wear if you need to breast feed in public, but I know they’re a pretty much a luxury if you are short on cash. 

Do you eat with a blanket over your head? No. Guess what? Neither should babies.

You know what’s awesome, growing up in a community where everything you and your neighbors, classmates, and peers do is mocked and described as “lower class.” It does wonders for your sense of self worth growing up.

We keep talking about the war on the middle class, and that’s all fine but when are we going to address how vile and hateful we are to the “lower class.”

this in combination with that "If I was a black kid" (even though i’m actually a privileged white guy) with his “why don’t black kids do better” article - i am done with the internet today

newwavefeminism:

I remember posting this once and getting into a massive “debate” with a Canadian about how ignorant & racist I was for saying that TV was still racist when they saw all TYPES of diversity on TV - apparently.
People get SO MAD when you point out racism on TV as if i’m about to come to their house and put them on house arrest for watching shows or something.

newwavefeminism:

I remember posting this once and getting into a massive “debate” with a Canadian about how ignorant & racist I was for saying that TV was still racist when they saw all TYPES of diversity on TV - apparently.

People get SO MAD when you point out racism on TV as if i’m about to come to their house and put them on house arrest for watching shows or something.

bitchesguidetoetiquette:

Flawless logic at play

sneakyfeets:

rapunzelie:

oops I went on a rant

last one is truth

I am constantly perplexed and annoyed by the persistent bias against female bosses. Even many feminist women will unleash a torrent of misogynist tropes at the mere mention of female colleagues: Women are terrible bosses; female colleagues are the worst; women are back-stabbing, catty, two-faced, incompetent, etc.

This has not been my experience. I have had multiple female bosses, and I have loved working for all of them.

My first job out of college started as a temporary position at a reception desk. When I started, the president (a man) and vice-president (a woman) of the firm were traveling out of the office for a few days. I was told they’d be calling in for messages, and I was warned—repeatedly—that the vice-president, Helene, was a dragon lady, a bitch, a holy terror. The nicest way it was put to me is that she was “difficult.” I was admonished to be very careful about how I gave her messages to her, because she would destroy me if I made a mistake.

I made sure to provide her messages in precisely the way I’d been instructed, and she was perfectly polite to me over the phone. But, by the time she was due back in the office, I’d been warned about her so many times, in so many blunt and nasty ways, that I was, frankly, terrified of her.

Helene returned to the office one morning, an hour late as I would discover was her habit. She was a beautiful, fashionable, confident woman. She introduced herself brusquely, but welcomed me to the team. I was intimidated by the sheer force of her presence, but she seemed nice enough. I waited for the other shoe to drop, for the dragon lady to reveal herself.

That day never came.

Within a couple of months, my position had been made permanent, and I was quickly promoted to an assistant position in Helene’s department. Helene was tough. She had high expectations of me. But she was also an incredibly generous mentor. I was eager to learn, and she was keen to teach me. She wanted things done a certain way, but she was open to suggestions and encouraged me to challenge her. And if I ever came up with a better way to do something, she was grateful for the idea and let me know she was proud of me. She never took credit for my ideas; to the contrary, she championed me.

By the time I left, I was the director of her department, and I had my own office overlooking Lake Michigan. From reception to an executive office in five years. And it was in no small part because of Helene’s eminent willingness to teach, support, and empower me.

The thing is, Helene could indeed be “difficult.” But not with me. She was “difficult” with the male executives who treated her like shit, with the male staff who undermined her authority. She was “difficult” with people who treated her, the only female executive at the firm, fundamentally differently than they treated the men.

Funny that I developed a reputation for being “difficult,” too.

This has been my experience working for and with “difficult” women. I’m sure there are shitty female bosses in the world; of course there are. But lots of what supposedly constitutes a “difficult” female boss, or colleague, is frequently a reflection of dynamics to which she’s reacting.

Dynamics like the one in which people reject female bosses, instead of rejecting workplace misogyny.
Melissa McEwan, Who’s the Boss? (via dee-lirious)

inthepursuitofincredible:

oreides:

fucking rich white people laughing at how poverty is some diet they should try.

What dicks

nataliemeansnice:

SEE WHAT THEY DO TO YOU? ALWAYS MAKE YOU FEEL ONE STEP BEHIND. ALWAYS STRIVING FOR SOME FABRICATED IDEA OF PERFECTION CONCOCTED BY THOSE WHO DO NOT CARE ABOUT YOUR INHERENT WORTH.
DON’T. BELIEVE. THEIR. BULLSHIT.
YOUR SELF-LOATHING IS THEIR PAYCHECK.
YOUR SELF-HATRED IS THEIR CHRISTMAS BONUS.
YOUR FEAR IS THEIR SUMMER HOUSE IN THE HAMPTONS.
YOU’RE WORTH SO SO SO MUCH INFINITELY MORE THAN THIS JUNK.

nataliemeansnice:

SEE WHAT THEY DO TO YOU? ALWAYS MAKE YOU FEEL ONE STEP BEHIND. ALWAYS STRIVING FOR SOME FABRICATED IDEA OF PERFECTION CONCOCTED BY THOSE WHO DO NOT CARE ABOUT YOUR INHERENT WORTH.

DON’T. BELIEVE. THEIR. BULLSHIT.

YOUR SELF-LOATHING IS THEIR PAYCHECK.

YOUR SELF-HATRED IS THEIR CHRISTMAS BONUS.

YOUR FEAR IS THEIR SUMMER HOUSE IN THE HAMPTONS.

YOU’RE WORTH SO SO SO MUCH INFINITELY MORE THAN THIS JUNK.